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Woman Votes Topless After Being Told To Cover Anti-Trump T-Shirt

Woman Votes Topless After Being Told To Cover Anti-Trump T-Shirt

Moderator Paul Scafidi revealed that the woman was wearing a "McCain Hero, Trump Zero" t-shirt when she came to cast her vote.

Image Source: Photo by Misha Friedman/Getty Images

A New Hampshire woman ended up casting her vote topless during Tuesday's primary election after being told that she could not wear a shirt an anti-Trump t-shirt. Paul Scafidi, a town moderator in Exeter, revealed that a woman had entered a New Hampshire gym which was converted into a polling station on Tuesday afternoon with a "McCain Hero, Trump Zero." According to the New Hampshire Union Leader, electoral laws prohibit the presence of campaigners in polling places and this includes clothing that promotes or denigrates a candidate present on the ballot. Anyone prosecuted for this offense could be fined up to $1000 Thus, Scafidi stepped in to remind her that the t-shirt violated the electioneering rules.



 

Tuesday’s ballot featured races for Congress and governor, and it did not have Trump or McCain, who died in 2018, on it. When Scafidi informed the unidentified woman that her t-shirt needs to be covered up, she pointed towards another nearby woman's t-shirt which featured the American flag. "She asked why her and not me?" said Scafidi, per The Hill. The moderator then explained that an American flag was not electioneering but her "Trump Zero" was. "I said she was going to have to cover her shirt, and [a shirt] supporting the American flag was not electioneering. That’s my opinion, and that was my call as the moderator," he continued.



 

The woman then asked if he wanted her to take off her top, even though she was not wearing anything underneath it, reports Huffington Post. "I said I’d rather she not," said Scafidi, "But she took it off so fast, no one had time to react. So the whole place just went, ‘whoa,’ and she walked away, and I let her vote." After casting her vote topless, the woman put her shirt back on and left the premises, according to Yahoo News. Scafidi revealed that he did not want to escalate the already awkward situation by intervening further or getting the police involved. However, noted that he could have easily got her arrested for violating the state indecency law. "I don’t know if she was trying to have me get her arrested, but I thought it was better to just let things play out," he said.



 

"I don’t think there were more than 15 voters in the building at the time and if there were any children there, I didn’t see them," continued the moderator. "If she felt it was her right, more power to her," he said, but added, "She could’ve just gone into the hallway and turned it inside-out." Furthermore, he said, "We all laughed about it as things were winding down, so I don’t know if it was a set-up, but I’ve never experienced anything like that. We had more important things to worry about; we had to get 2,000 people to vote safely, and check-in and count 2,000 absentee ballots." Another voter present at the scene said, "I think we all kind of needed it. With everything going on in the world, it’s like, who cares? 



 

Back in 2018, a man was asked to remove his pro-Trump t-shirt before casting his vote at the Murrells Inlet-Garden City Fire Department in South Carolina. "When this gentleman got up to the poll worker, they told him he couldn't come in with his shirt on, so he just took it off, tossed it down on the ground there and voted shirtless and then came out and put it back on," shared Todd Price who was also in the line to vote. The spokesman for the South Carolina Election Commission Chris Whitmire at the time told CNN that the man's shirt did not violate the campaign material rules as Trump was not on the Midterm election ballot.



 

"The shirt in question didn’t relate to a candidate in this election," said Whitmire. "It’s an understandable mistake. Poll managers are volunteers that are working hard out there, trying to do the right thing. If you closely read the handbook on campaign material, that didn’t violate the definition of material."

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