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Trump Donated $100,000 From His Presidential Salary For Alcoholism Research

Trump Donated $100,000 From His Presidential Salary For Alcoholism Research

After losing his elder brother Fred Trump Jr. in 1981 due to alcoholism, President Trump decided to help fund a federal agency that looks at alcoholism research.

President Donald Trump chose to donate his third-quarterly salary from 2018 to a federal agency that is invested in researching alcoholism and its related problems. According to USA Today, the White House announced how the current president of the United States gave away $100,000 to the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism.

Back in 2016, when Trump pledged as a candidate, he promised not to accept the annual salary of $400,000 which is provided to every President of the US. However, the law required him to be paid for his services. Even though Trump accepted the sum of money, he chose to donate it to various agencies including the Departments of Education, Veterans Affairs, Health and Human Services, Transportation, and several others.



 

 

Trump, 73, has had a rough journey when it came to problems pertaining to alcoholism. Providing an account regarding the relationship he had with his older brother Fred Trump Jr., Trump revealed how his sibling's struggle with alcohol addictions drove him to declare war on the present opioid crisis the country is facing.

Speaking to The Washington Post, the current POTUS said, "I guess you could say now I'm the chief of trying to solve it." He revealed, "I don't know that I'd be working, devoting the kind of time and energy and even the money we are allocating to (the opioid crisis) ... I don't know that I'd be doing that had I not had the experience with Fred."



 

After struggling with alcohol addictions, Trump's elder brother Fred Jr. passed away in 1981. President Trump is hardly known to admit his mistakes or publicly speak about his personal life, however, he admitted his mistake about pressurizing Fred while speaking to the outlet.

"I do regret having put pressure on him," said Trump. Accepting the fact that his brother had no interest what so ever to run the family business he said, "It was just not his thing. . . . I think the mistake that we made was we assumed that everybody would like it. That would be the biggest mistake. . . . There was sort of a double pressure put on him (by his father and brother)."



 

 

In addition to this, he revealed how he once told his brother how he was "wasting his time" by holding on to his dreams of becoming a pilot rather than joining the family's business. "I actually don’t know if I ever argued with [Fred Jr.], other than to sort of tell him, 'Gee, you should love this, this business; we can do something great here," said Trump.

The Post further stated how his older brother's conflict with his addiction "scarred (the President) like no other event, and he said he remains haunted by watching Fred Jr.'s handsome features fade." Explaining the process of physical degradation, Trump said, "He was so handsome, and I saw what alcohol did to him even physically ... and that had an impact on me, too." Trump also mentioned how his brother "actually lived a long time, longer than you would expect."



 

 

Recalling one incident, he shared how he asked his brother what made him like alcohol so much when he was hospitalized. As the President himself doesn't smoke or drink, it was indeed a mystery to him.

"I used to ask, 'Is it the taste, or what is it?'" recalled Trump. "He didn't know what to say about it because, frankly, it was just something that he liked," he added. Trump also revealed how Fred Jr. had to be sent to a rehabilitation program "a number of times."

"I don’t think it was necessarily a stay-over rehab because he lived in the house. I don’t remember it as being a stay-over. But I spent a lot of times with Fred." Addressing concerns of addiction, Trump told The Post, "Let's say I started drinking, it's very possible I wouldn't be talking to you right now," adding, "there is something about the genetic effect."



 

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