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There's A New U.S. Quarter And It Features 2 Bats Hanging Upside Down On One Side

There's A New U.S. Quarter And It Features 2 Bats Hanging Upside Down On One Side

The new quarters will feature the Samoan fruit bat in honor of the National Park of American Samoa. The change is a part of the America the Beautiful Quarters Program that was launched in 2010.

2020 is the year you literally bat out new change! Confused? Well, the U.S. Mint revealed that as part of America the Beautiful Quarters Program that was launched in 2010, quarters this year will get a design upgrade. According to People, the new quarters will feature the Samoan fruit bat in honor of the National Park of American Samoa. The design will have a mother fruit bat hanging upside down as her cub peers out from her wings, evoking “the remarkable care and energy that this species puts into their offspring,” said the U.S. Mint.

US Mint

 

Fruit bats are not your typical bats. These bats are active both during the day and at night and they are known to have a wingspan of around three feet,  according to the National Park Service. There are three species that occupy the Samoan park,  two that are large and one that’s smaller and eats insects.

US Mint

 

“The design is intended to promote awareness to the species’ threatened status due to habitat loss and commercial hunting,” the Mint said. “The National Park of American Samoa is the only park in the United States that is home to the Samoan fruit bat.” The 25-cent pieces will be inscribed with the words “National Park American Samoa 2020,” as well as the traditional motto of the United States, “E Pluribus Unum,” which appears on all U.S. coins and is Latin for “out of many, one.”



 

 

The new quarters will be released on February 3, according to the U.S. Mint. There are also going to be a lot more new designs in 2020, and this year literally seems to be the year of change. Coin enthusiasts can look forward to in 2020 include the Weir Farm National Historic Site in Connecticut, the Salt River Bay National Historical Park and Ecological Preserve in the U.S. Virgin Islands, the Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller National Historical Park in Vermont and the Tallgrass Prairie National Preserve in Kansas.

It seems like people are welcoming the change to their quarters with open arms. Sue Collins wrote: Bats are fascinating animals! Was in Australia some years ago and at an animal park, they had an enclosure where you could walk around amidst the flying foxes (very large fruit-eating bats). An AWESOME experience!" However, there were quite a few people who seemed miffed that a bat made it to a coin, but there's still no progress about Harriet Truman being allotted a place on the $20 bills.



 


 

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