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23-Year-Old Student Designs Towel To Help Resuscitate Babies Who Stop Breathing

23-Year-Old Student Designs Towel To Help Resuscitate Babies Who Stop Breathing

Nina Birchard, a student from Glasgow, wishes to "see it implemented in Scotland at least and even one day make a global impact."

Nina Birchard, a Glasgow student, has designed a towel that could help save a baby's life! This ingenious product comes with a special set of instructions printed carefully on it. The live-saving towel also contains a hand pump, which when squeezed helps you inflate the adjustable neck support, hence raising the baby's upper back and clearing their airway. Birchard has high hopes for her 'Resusci Towel' and expects this clever creation to have a 'global impact' on resuscitating babies reports Metro

 



 



 

This towel comes as a blessing to people who are clueless about performing CPR on a little baby. This 23-year-old product design engineer student has also been trying to resolve the problems that usually emerge while reviving an infant. Loss of heat is a common issue that hinders the process of reviving a baby successfully. So, solving that issue she has designed her product in such a way that it maintains the perfect amount of warmth required by the baby and also keeps them in the ideal position.

 



 

Every year six percent of babies all around the world are in need of resuscitation reveals Birchard. She believes that her latest device could come in handy when midwives are delivering their newborns. According to last year's statistics uploaded by the World Health Organization, 2.5 million children worldwide have died during the first month of their life in 2017. Approximately 7000 of these newborns died every day which upped the percentage of death in children under the age of 5 by 47% from 40% in 1990. 



 

"Preterm birth, intrapartum-related complications (birth asphyxia or lack of breathing at birth), infections and birth defects," were the main reasons behind these neonatal deaths in 2016.  They also mention how "vast majority of newborn deaths take place in low and middle-income countries." This product ensures that nothing would happen again. "Accelerated progress for neonatal survival and promotion of health and wellbeing requires strengthening the quality of care as well as ensuring the availability of quality health services for the small and sick newborn," claims their website and this product is the perfect answer to this problem.

Source: Getty Images

The 23-year-old has recently filed for a patent of her own creation which she came up with after working for a company. "I came up with it after working for a company last summer who design CPR devices," she said explaining how she came up with this idea. Furthermore, she recalled coming across a similar piece of research which was trying to resolve the problem she was tackling. "I came across a piece of research which was trying to solve the problem I’m tackling," she said. "It led me to want to explore the problem further surrounding the positions of babies and heat loss during resuscitation," she added.

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"Around six percent of babies worldwide, every year need some form of resuscitation and the problem about positioning is something I’m trying to tackle," she explained. Bichard has to extensively research the equipment and methods generally used for the purpose of resuscitation to get a clear idea of how the thing works. She went ahead and attended a separate resuscitation course to understand the process better. Delving deep into the mechanism of the equipment she was finally able to combine her innovative ideas with the already existing ones.

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"I looked at what midwives performing the procedure currently do if they’re in an emergency, to try and understand what the current situation is," she said. "I took part in a training course where I could observe people and saw they’re using towels already and realized there’s an opportunity to use something that’s already in use," she remarked of the situation that sparked this idea in her mind. In order to make the usage of her device easy, she said, "One of the great things is it has printed instructions on it so it gives people the basic steps to perform the procedure."

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Further explaining how to actually use the product she said, "There’s a collar support and when you squeeze the pump it fills with air and it elevates their upper back – opening their airways to try and ventilate them and get their first breath. That level of support that’s needed can vary a lot depending on the size of the baby and I’ve designed it so it can be adjusted in a really quick way." She also added, "It also reduces the chances of confusion and helps get the procedure right." The young student recently showcased her work at the Glasgow School of Art Degree Show with the hope that midwives and doctors adopt this method.

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"It’s pretty dangerous to use the adult technique on a baby," she warns. She then goes on to state the importance of her creation. "I think based on the feedback I’ve got already it gives less confident health professionals the confidence and ability to carry out the procedure quickly and effectively." Expressing her wish she says, "I would like to see it implemented in Scotland at least and even one day make a global impact."

Source: Getty Images

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