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Black Security Guard Fired By School For Telling A Student Not To Call Him The N-Word

Black Security Guard Fired By School For Telling A Student Not To Call Him The N-Word

Marlon Anderson, a former guard at Madison West High School in Wisconsin, was asked to help the Assistant Principal remove an unruly student from the school's premises who directed expletives and the racial slur towards him.

An African American security guard lost his job after asking a student to stop calling him the n-word. On October 9, Marlon Anderson, a former guard at Madison West High School in Wisconsin, was asked to help the Assistant Principal Jennifer Talarczyk remove an unruly student from the school's premises.

According to a report by BBC News, the student who had been accused of taking another pupil's phone was resisting, yelling, and pushing Talarczyk, when Anderson was called for immediate assistance. On his arrival, the 17-year-old began directing expletives and racial slurs towards him. 



 

 

Initially, Anderson asked the boy to stop calling him that word without directly using it. Despite his constant warnings, the mischief-maker continued using different variations of the n-word, reports CNN.

Finally, he responded saying, "Don't call me (n-word)". According to Anderson,  Mrs. Talarczyk, who was present at the scene kept her walkie talkie activated allowing the staff members to listen intently to the conversation that was going on.

Although, the school did not respond directly to Anderson's dismissal, they explained having a zero-tolerance policy for the use of any racial slurs. 



 

In a statement Gloria Reyes, the president of the Madison Board of Education said, "We are working to make our school climates the best they can be for all students and staff. We've taken a tough stance on racial slurs, and we believe that language has no place in schools."

However, Anderson who doesn't necessarily agree with their prevalent policy said, "The district just wants to say you can't use this word, period." He further told CNN that, "these policies are hurting the kids and staff. Without context this isn't helpful; it's more hurtful."



 

 

Reyes also informed that the school board plans on reviewing their approach. "This is an incredibly difficult situation, and we acknowledge the emotion, harm and complexity involved," she said in a statement.

"Many people in our community and our district are grappling with that complexity, and we will continue to do so as we go forward." This week, a union representing Anderson filed a grievance with the school district on his behalf. The union states that Anderson is now seeking reinstatement and back pay. 



 

Anderson who feels that he has the right not to be called that racial slur, said, "My father was called this word, my grandmother, my grandfather and keep going down the family line."

Furthermore, he added, "We were all called this word, and not one of them could say, 'don't call me that.' I can. And I shouldn't be punished because I have the right to tell somebody not to call me this word. I made a conscious decision to address the word, because it is an epidemic."



 

 

Having worked at the school district for 11 years, he has accumulated quite a few supporters. Learning about his current predicament, The Boys & Girls Club of Dane County hired him as their temporary director of program operations.

Announcing the same on Facebook, the nonprofit mentioned how Anderson has had "an amazing track record" with the teenagers in the area. One of Anderson's sons' who is currently a president of the school's Black student union, protested this decision by leading a walkout on Friday.

According to BBC News, they chanted "Hey-hey, hey-ho, zero tolerance has got to go," and "Do better." Even singer Cher offered to pay for his legal expenses if Anderson was planning on suing the school. 



 

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