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Robin Williams Always Asked Film Companies To Hire Homeless People If They Wanted To Sign Him

Robin Williams Always Asked Film Companies To Hire Homeless People If They Wanted To Sign Him

After the legendary comedian died in 2014, a fan shared the unusual task that Williams' rider stipulated.

When the legendary Robin Williams died by suicide in 2014, the world was shocked, and the tributes came flooding in. One account stood out as an illustration of the comedian's thoughtfulness and kindness. While tech and hospitality riders for stars often contain lists of outrageous demands, a fan shared details from Williams' rider that pinpointed an unusual yet difficult task for potential employers. Writing on his website, Brian Lord recalled once having access to the rider after an enquiry about his availability. "I never actually booked Robin Williams for an event, but I came close enough that his office sent over his rider." he wrote, further explaining, "For those outside of the entertainment industry, a rider lists out an artist’s specific personal and technical needs for hosting them for an event- anything from bottled water and their green room to sound and lighting requirements.  You can learn a lot about a person from their rider."



 

Williams' rider had one particular request that stood out. "When I got Robin Williams’ rider, I was very surprised by what I found.   He actually had a requirement that for every single event or film he did, the company hiring him also had to hire a certain number of homeless people and put them to work," Lord wrote. He said that this information completely changed the way he watched Williams' films after that moment, knowing that the star had made sure to use his clout in a way that would help people in need.



 

"I’m sure that on his own time and with his own money, he was working with these people in need, but he’d also decided to use his clout as an entertainer to make sure that production companies and event planners also learned the value of giving people a chance to work their way back," he wrote, pondering whether Williams' collaborators had kept up the practice in their subsequent projects. "I wonder how many production companies continued the practice into their next non-Robin Williams project, as well as how many people got a chance at a job and the pride of earning an income, even temporarily, from his actions. He was a great multiplier of his impact." Williams' death was a huge loss to the entertainment industry, but his legacy lives on forever. If everyone took the star's thoughtfulness to heart, imagine how many people could benefit! 

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