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Listening To Christmas Music Could Be Bad For Your Mental Health, Claims Psychologist

Listening To Christmas Music Could Be Bad For Your Mental Health, Claims Psychologist

Store workers were “more at risk” of being mentally drained by the array of cheerful music. The same songs being played constantly makes it hard for employees to “tune it out” and “unable to focus on anything else," said clinical psychologist Linda Blair.

Christmas is the most joyous time of the year, but it is also the most stressful. Well, you'd think it is because it's that time of the year when your friends and family get together. It's also the time when the entire town is belting out cheerful Christmas music, and you'd expect it to brighten up your mood.

However, listening to the cheerful, jolly music will not help you relax, a British psychologist said, according to reports by Fox News. It seems that listening to all that Christmas music could actually harm a person's mental health, clinical psychologist Linda Blair told Sky News.

Blair said the continuous playing of Christmas music in the car or at stores acts as a reminder to people of all the things they have to do before the holiday arrives.

“You’re simply spending all of your energy trying not to hear what you’re hearing,” she said. Blair said store workers were “more at risk” of being mentally drained by the array of cheerful music. The same songs being played constantly makes it hard for employees to “tune it out” and “unable to focus on anything else.”



 

 

“Christmas music is likely to irritate people if it’s played too loudly and too early,” Blair added. She also said that people working at stores that play Christmas music must learn how to tune these songs out, otherwise, they'd have to spend all their energy trying to ignore these songs.

However, workers seem to think that this music does, in fact, lift their spirits up and puts them in the holiday mood. 

Best Buy started playing holiday music on Oct. 22, which made the electronic store the first to stream Christmas songs. A few days later, other stores such as Sears, Ulta and Michaels followed suit.

Mood Media’s programming executive, Danny Turner, told the Tampa Bay Times that he urges stores to stop playing novelty music because there are chances that it could annoy customers. There are customers who say that these tunes do put a smile on their face unless it's a really annoying song. 



 

 

“The one I have in mind is 'The 12 Days of Christmas,'” Turner told the Tampa Bay Times. “Once I’m on the third day, I’m counting how many days are left. You don’t want any songs that feel like they last for 12 days.”

A poll was also conducted to determine when was the right time to actually start playing Christmas music and a lot of people seemed to agree that the right time was after Thanksgiving. 



 

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