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Princess Diana Once Stopped At A Cemetery To Comfort Woman Crying At Her Dead Son's Grave

Princess Diana Once Stopped At A Cemetery To Comfort Woman Crying At Her Dead Son's Grave

A few weeks before her death, she made an unplanned trip to a cemetery in Bosnia as she didn't know why the image of a cemetery was stuck in her head.

Above anything else, Princess Diana was a humanitarian who traveled all around the world to tend to such causes. Amidst numerous visits, Di's final humanitarian trip to Bosnia was one emotional journey that brought forth her compassionate spirit which inspires us all to this day. During her ongoing crusade against landmines in the war-ravaged Bosnia, she decided to take a detour and visit a nearby cemetery reports Entertainment Weekly. Here she chanced upon another mother grieving the loss of her son and the way our Late Princess comforted her was truly heartwarming. 

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On  August 8, 1997, Diana made this unplanned visit to Sarajevo War Cemetery accompanied by Jerry White. Recalling this particular incident, White, who was a part of the documentary, Diana, Our Mother, expressed how much it touched him as well. According to reports, the Princess died just three weeks following this trip and it still haunts White, who said, "The image of her in a cemetery in Sarajevo, on the last day of our three-day trip [still haunts me]. It wasn’t planned. It was never on the itinerary. But Diana told me three times, 'I can’t get this picture of me in a cemetery out of my mind.'"

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"She asked me if there was a cemetery nearby, as it was something we should visit,” he recalled adding how she was adamant about paying a visit despite the time constraint. "'Jerry, I have this feeling, this image of me in a cemetery, it’s strange.' We were running late for a final reception, and there was no room for this detour, but Lady Diana seemed adamant, mysteriously." Giving in to her wishes, they drove out towards the former Olympic stadium which had now been converted to a huge graveyard for people who were killed during the war. " I watched as Diana took her place among hundreds of tombstones. It was eerie, now that I reflect on it. She walked slowly, among tombstones and even yellow rosebushes," shared White. 

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Finally, she came across a mother who was weeping the loss of her son near his grave. Now, Diana didn't speak Bosnian but that didn't hold her back from comforting the woman. "She met a Bosnian mother tending to the grave of her son, grieving visibly. Diana didn’t speak Bosnian, and this mother didn’t know English. So, they just embraced. So intimately, so physical, so emotional, mother-to-mother. It was vintage Diana, reaching out, wiping the mother’s tears and cheeks," said White according to EW. 

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"It’s the only framed photograph of Diana I still have in my home. After her death in Paris only weeks later, I came to wonder whether the Princess intuited her own death, her burial. I don’t know, but maybe, psychically, intuitively, Diana sensed she was going to die. It still gives me chills when I recall this powerful, unscripted, unplanned moment, somehow prescient," he continued. Lady Di also visited Angola and advocated the same cause. She was photographed wearing a  visor and bomb-proof breastplate as she made her way through a minefield. And now Prince Harry has carried her legacy forward by working alongside the same Halo Trust, which works towards removing landmines in Angola.



 

The documentary director Ashley Gething and executive-producer Nick Kent believe, "Diana’s legacy has lasting relevance because she touched so many people’s lives." Speaking to EW, Kent and Gething said, "Although she was the daughter of an Earl and married into the Royal Family, Princess Diana had a natural empathy that meant she connected with people irrespective of their class, creed, race, or nationality. Perhaps this empathy came from her own vulnerability (as her brother, Charles, suggests in our film) and people around the world continue to respond to that… She was immensely courageous in embracing causes that were not popular and in some cases deeply controversial: homelessness, AIDS, and the campaign she waged in the last weeks of her life to ban landmines. Only now, looking back, can you appreciate how far-sighted, bold and brave she was in embracing these causes."



 

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