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Michelle Obama Opens Up About Miscarriage: "I Felt Like I Failed"

Michelle Obama Opens Up About Miscarriage: "I Felt Like I Failed"

"We sit in our own pain, thinking that somehow we’re broken. That's one of the reasons why I think it's important to talk to young mothers about the fact that miscarriages happen.”

Michelle Obama has never been someone to beat around the bush. She's always been honest and open about herself and about the struggles she's faced in her life. In her memoir, Becoming, she's left no stone unturned as she bared her soul to her readers. In the book, she reveals she struggled with fertility issues before conceiving her two daughters, Sasha and Malia. In an interview with Robin Roberts for a special on the book, the former First Lady opened up about a miscarriage she had over two decades ago, according to Good Morning America



 

“I felt lost and alone, and I felt like I failed because I didn't know how common miscarriages were because we don't talk about them,” Obama said. “We sit in our own pain, thinking that somehow we’re broken. That's one of the reasons why I think it's important to talk to young mothers about the fact that miscarriages happen.” Michelle Obama also revealed that she underwent in vitro fertilization (IVF) in her mid-30s in order to conceive her two daughters, after realizing “the biological clock is real because egg production is limited.”



 

 

"I realized that as I was 34 and 35," said Obama, now the mother of 17-year-old Sasha and 20-year-old Malia. "We had to do IVF." Michelle Obama, who is known for her advocacy for women and girls around the world,  says she decided to share her story with the rest of the world because she wanted to know that they are not alone, especially if they are trying to start a family. 

 



 

Michelle Obama says she decided to get candid about her miscarriage and her journey to motherhood in “Becoming” to help other women. “I think it's the worst thing that we do to each other as women, not share the truth about our bodies and how they work," Obama told Roberts. Michelle's memoir goes places that only a few other autobiographies have dared to go before, laying it raw and real before the readers. 



 

She was also quite honest about how her seemingly perfect marriage needed a little push. “Marriage counseling for us was one of those ways where we learned how to talk out our differences,” she told Roberts. “I know too many young couples who struggle and think that somehow there's something wrong with them. And I want them to know that Michelle and Barack Obama, who have a phenomenal marriage and who love each other, we work on our marriage. And we get help with our marriage when we need it.”



 

“This was my pivot point,” she wrote. “My moment of self-arrest.” But there's one thing that she seems to be hesitant about, and it's unlikely that she will ever run for office. “If I’d learned anything from the ugliness of the campaign, from the myriad of ways people had sought to write me off as angry or unbecoming, it was that public judgment sweeps in to fill any void. I knew that I would never allow myself to get that banged up again. I’ve never been a fan of politics, and my experience over the last 10 years has done little to change that. I continue to be put off by the nastiness.”



 

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