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Man Quits High-Paying Job To Make Beds For Kids So They Don't Have To Sleep On The Floor

Man Quits High-Paying Job To Make Beds For Kids So They Don't Have To Sleep On The Floor

They have more than 65 chapters now. With the motto "No kid sleeps on the floor in our town," all of the chapters together have built and delivered more than 1,500 free beds to children across America.

We all have goals in life and we work hard to achieve them. We all want to be successful in life and live the rest of our lives lavishly. This is the story of a man named Luke Mickelson. The 41-year-old man was born and raised in Idaho, and he was a high school quarterback-turned-family-man. He had a yielding career and was a regular churchgoer who coached his kids' sports teams. He even indulged in a bit of fishing from time to time. But all of this and life as he knew it was about to change. It all began as a simple project in 2012 when Luke and his family got together to help build a few beds when they learned that there were children in their town that had to sleep on the floor. 



 

"This little girl had a nest of clothes, it looked like a little bird's nest. And that's what she slept on, that's what her bed was," Mickelson said, according to CNN. "When we delivered the bed, she hugged it and just couldn't let go." But, he soon realized that there were a lot more kids that slept on the floor because they did not have beds to sleep on. "It was such an eye-opener to me," he recalled. "I sat there in silence thinking, 'Is that really what's going on?'"



 

He was shocked by the need for beds, and at that moment, he decided he had to do something about it. As a solution to this, Mickelson founded Sleep in Heavenly Peace, a nonprofit that builds and delivers beds to children in need. "I had no clue about what the need was," Mickelson said. "There's kids next door whose parents are struggling just to put food on the table, clothes on their back, a roof over their head. A bed was just a luxury."



 

Luke started to buy wood to build beds using guidelines and his daughter's bunk bed as a template. He did all of this from his own money and he sought help from his friends and family members to help him build the beds. Soon, word spread of Luke's good deed, and more people who were interested to help showed up, along with investment from his and other communities to help him make more beds. 



 

"That first project, we built 11 bunk beds in my garage," he said. "The next year, we did 15. Then it doubled every year. In 2017, we built 612 bunk beds." Luke then went on to set up a formal charity, complete with training courses, construction manuals, and local chapters so people from other communities could do this as well. They have more than 65 chapters now. With the motto 'No kid sleeps on the floor in our town', all of the chapters together have built and delivered more than 1,500 free beds to children across the U.S.



 

For Luke, his NGO growing meant he had to make a really difficult choice. Would he throw it all away to get back to his well-paying job, or continue doing goodwill for the people who actually need it? Well, it does not really come as a surprise that he decided to choose his nonprofit, as he went from making "great money to zero money." He's never looked back. "I found that the need I have isn't financial," he said. "The need I have is seeing the joy on kids' faces, knowing that I can make a difference."



 

"I quit my job of 18 years because I wanted to do this full-time, or at least as much as I possibly could because I knew the need was big. It just came to a point where I could see that my passion really is helping these kids. It was gratifying to see my kids and my family be involved with it and help them learn the value of service, but also seeing everybody else feel and see that joy from helping kids get off the floor. It's contagious," he said. 



 

"The underlying tone is, "We're here for the child." You walk in and these kids are just so excited. They want to help build it. They want to run the drills. They want to bring in wood. Just giving a kid a sense of ownership, a sense of responsibility, as well as a good night's sleep, is tremendous for them. They learn how to take care of things. They learn value. They get confidence -- and they get a good night's sleep," he concludes!



 

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