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Lori Loughlin Regrets Her Role In College Admissions Scandal But Defends The Allegations Against Her

Lori Loughlin Regrets Her Role In College Admissions Scandal But Defends The Allegations Against Her

The 55-year-old actress admits that she was remorseful and deeply regrets any part she played in the college admissions scandal but also claims that she hasn't actually committed a felony.

The 2019 college admissions bribery scandal arose over a criminal conspiracy to influence undergraduate admissions decisions at several top American universities. The investigation into the conspiracy was nicknamed 'Operation Varsity Blues.'

Among the high-profile names that have surfaced from the investigations is actress Lori Loughlin, who is best known for her role as Rebecca Donaldson-Katsopolis on the ABC sitcom Full House and its Netflix sequel Fuller House. On March 12, the US attorney’s office in Massachusetts announced it had indicted Loughlin and her husband Mossimo Giannulli in the shocking nationwide scam.



 

 

Loughlin, 55, and husband  Mossimo Giannulli, 56, were accused of paying $500,000 to admissions scam mastermind William "Rick" Singer to get daughters Olivia Jade and Isabella recruited onto the University of Southern California (USC) crew team despite neither girl being a coxswain. The girls' statuses at the college were put on hold amid an internal investigation into the admissions scam.

Loughlin recently regretted her alleged participation in the college admissions scandal, but at the same time stands by the opinion that she didn't actually do anything wrong. 



 

 

“Lori is remorseful, and she has definite regrets,” a source told PEOPLE about Loughlin. “She’s embarrassed and hurt, and she knows that her reputation has been ruined for life. But she also believes the allegations against her aren’t true,” the source shared. “She honestly didn’t think what she was doing was any different than donating money for a library or athletic field,” added the source. “That’s the crux of why she pleaded not guilty.”



 

 

Loughlin and Giannulli are due in court once again on August 27th. The couple is expected to defend their rights to separate attorneys, as both are being represented by attorneys from the same law firm in order to put forth a "united front".  “Lori is ready for this to be over,” said the source. “They all are. At this point, it would be better to spend a few months in jail — because she’s been spending the last several months in her own prison.”



 

 

Apparently, the couple rejected the plea deal that other parents allegedly involved in the case accepted. Among the 14 others who did accept was Felicity Huffman, but Loughlin and Giannulli declined it as it reportedly included jail time. “They weren’t ready to accept that,” says said the source. 

So as things stand, depending on how the court hearing goes on Tuesday, Loughlin and Giannulli can face up to 40 years in jail, if convicted on all counts. Their charges are of money laundering and conspiracy.

Another source added, “She honestly didn’t think what she was doing was any different than donating money for a library or athletic field. That’s the crux of why she pleaded not guilty.” “Lori is ready for this to be over. They all are," the source said. "At this point, it would be better to spend a few months in jail — because she’s been spending the last several months in her own prison.”



 


 A total of 50 people have been charged in the investigations behind 'Operation Varsity Blues'. This number includes 33 parents of college applicants and 11 named collegiate coaches or athletic administrators from eight universities. Multiple lawsuits were immediately filed against universities and individuals. The case is the largest of its kind to be prosecuted by the US Justice Department. 



 

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