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Kobe Bryant Died Due To Blunt-Force Trauma, Reveals Autopsy Report Four Months After Crash

Kobe Bryant Died Due To Blunt-Force Trauma, Reveals Autopsy Report Four Months After Crash

Kobe Bryant's body was found on one side of the wreckage, while his daughter, Gigi's body was found in a ravine on the opposite side.

Image Source: Instagram/Kobe Bryant

The world is still reeling from the shock of losing one of the greatest basketball players, Kobe Bryant, along with his daughter and seven others who died after their helicopter crashed into a mountainside in Calabasas, California, on January 26. According to ESPN, autopsy reports of all the passengers and the pilot were released on Friday. It revealed that the pilot, Ara Zobayan, 50, did not have alcohol or drugs in his system. The reports also revealed that all nine people aboard the helicopter, including the pilot, sustained immediate fatal injuries after it slammed into a hillside on the outskirts of Los Angeles.



 

The 180-page autopsy report delves into details of the victims' injuries,  but the cause of death for all nine passengers is listed as blunt force trauma, reports The New York Times. Kobe Bryant's 17-page report contains details about injuries almost all over his body. “These injuries are rapidly if not instantly fatal,” Juan Carrillo, senior deputy medical examiner, wrote in the report. adds Fox News. The details of broken bones, dismembered body parts, and an unmistakable stench of fuel on whatever clothing was left shows just how brutal the crash was. 

Source: Los Angeles County Medical Examiner-Coroner

The fatal flight was on its way to a basketball game at the Mamba Sports Academy in Thousand Oaks, when the helicopter slammed into a hill north of Los Angeles about 39 minutes after it took off from an airport in Santa Ana. The victims included two of Gianna’s teammates, their relatives, and a coach. Bryant's 13-year-old daughter was found in the jersey she had to play the basketball match in, on that fatal morning. It read “Bryant 2” on the back and “Mamba 2” on the front. Zobayan, an experienced pilot, often flew Bryant. Reports suggest that Zobayan almost managed to break through the clouds on that particularly foggy Sunday morning. 



 

However, the copter took an unexpected turn, plunging into the hillside. It was flying at a speed of 184 miles per hour and descending at a rate of more than 4,000 feet/minute when it struck the ground. The impact is said to have created a crater, scattering debris over a huge area in Calabasas hills. The deceased passengers were found with severe burns as flames engulfed the wreckage, but the fire left its marks on them only after their death, reveals autopsy reports. Bryant's body was found on one side of the wreckage, while his daughter's body was found in a ravine on the opposite side. 



 

Kobe Bryant was unrecognizable after the crash, but a forensic report states that there was a tattoo with his wife's name on his right shoulder, and further below were names of his daughters, Bianka Bella, Natalia Diamante and Gianna Maria-Onore. The youngest, Capri Kobe, only 7 months old when her father died, wasn't mentioned. Methylphenidate was the only drug found in Bryant's system and it is used to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder and narcolepsy. The autopsy reports come just days after Berge Zobayan, a personal representative for the late pilot claimed the victims' deaths were caused "in full or in part by the negligence or fault" of the plaintiffs and/or their decedent, which we reported about. 



 

Berge Zobayan, a representative for the late 50-year-old pilot, argued that the NBA player knew about the risks of flying, and so his surviving family members were not entitled to any damages from the pilot's estate. "Any injuries or damages to plaintiffs and/or their decedent were directly caused in full or in part by the negligence or fault of plaintiffs and/or their decedent, including their knowing and voluntary encounter with the risks involved, and that this negligence was a substantial factor in causing their purported damages, for which this answering defendant bears no responsibility," read the document filed by Berge. 



 

The controversial statement was made in response to widow Vanessa Bryant's lawsuit in February. In the complaint that states Vanessa and daughters as plaintiffs, she sued Island Express Helicopters and claims that pilot Ara Zobayan of Huntington Beach, California, who was piloting the flight at the time of the crash “failed to properly monitor and assess the weather prior to takeoff,” “failed to abort the flight when he knew of the cloudy conditions,” and “failed to properly and safely operate the helicopter resulting in a crash.” Vanessa and her daughters are seeking general, economic and punitive damages by filing the complaint against Island Express Helicopters.



 

Disclaimer : This is based on sources and we have been unable to verify this information independently.

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