×
KitKat Ditches Plastic Packaging For Paper Which Can Be Turned Into Origami

KitKat Ditches Plastic Packaging For Paper Which Can Be Turned Into Origami

Our broader vision and action plan outline our commitment and specific approach to addressing the plastics packaging waste issue," said the CEO of Nestlé, Mark Schneider.

With companies around the world look at ways to reduce plastic and increase sustainability, Nestlé Japan doesn't seem too far behind. According to Fox13, the candy giant has decided to swap it's miniature KitKat bars' plastic packaging with paper. Kitkat bars in Japan are famous for their unique flavors that include matcha and wasabi, and although they aren't easily available in the US, it will be an added bonus to munch on this delicious chocolate wafer that comes with an environmentally-friendly packaging.



 

 

According to reports, the paper wrapper will be first used for KitKat minis after which Nestlé Japan plans on rolling out the special outer packaging for larger KitKats in September next year and also single-layer paper wrappers for individual KitKats in 2021. Now, for the most exciting part. This new environment-friendly wrapper will come with printed instruction on how to transform the empty matte wrapper into a traditional origami crane, also known as an orizuru. 



 

Nestlé's decision to change the material of their packaging comes as a part of their plan to use only 100-percent recyclable packaging for its confectionery by 2025. "Nestlé today laid out its broader vision to achieve a waste-free future and announced a series of specific actions towards meeting its April 2018 commitment to make 100% of its packaging recyclable or reusable by 2025, with a particular focus on avoiding plastic-waste," read a statement published on its official website.



 

The CEO of Nestlé, Mark Schneider said, "Our broader vision and action plan outline our commitment and specific approach to addressing the plastics packaging waste issue. While we are committed to pursuing recycling options where feasible, we know that 100% recyclability is not enough to successfully tackle the plastics waste crisis," whilst adding, "We need to push the boundaries and do more. We are determined to look at every option to solve this complex challenge and embrace multiple solutions that can have an impact now. We believe in the value of recyclable and compostable paper-based materials and biodegradable polymers, in particular where recycling infrastructure does not exist."



 

Promising to be a leading company when it comes to recyclable packaging, he said, "Collective action is vital, which is why we are also engaging consumers, business partners and all of our Nestlé colleagues to play their part. You can count on us to be a leader in this space!" This waste-free future plan was unveiled last year and it clearly expressed the company's desire to stop their plastic packaging from adding on to the existing plastic pollution which usually ends up becoming a part of the world's major water bodies. 



 

Back in December, the company announced the creation of Nestlé Institute of Packaging Sciences, a new division created to evaluate and develop various sustainable packaging materials and to collaborate with industrial partners to develop new packaging materials and solutions. "Plastic waste is one of the biggest sustainability issues the world is facing today. Tackling it requires a collective approach. We are committed to finding improved solutions to reduce, re-use and recycle," said Schneider.



 

Recommended for you