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Judy Blume's 'Are You There God? It's Me, Margaret' Will Be Adapted Into A Movie

Judy Blume's 'Are You There God? It's Me, Margaret' Will Be Adapted Into A Movie

Not only will a new generation of youngsters be introduced to Margret's secret club, older fans too will take a trip down memory lane as Margaret is now making her way to the big screen.

Image Source: (L) Instagram/thegenerationxfiles (R) Instagram/hunter.south.350

Girls going through puberty consider Are You There God? It's Me, Margaret as a rite of passage. The book, written by Judy Blume, has been a friend and guide to generations of girls for 50 years now. It has stood the test of time and has managed to become an integral part of growing up. The novel has been frequently challenged for its bold discussions, and openly discusses the changes a young girl experiences as she traverses through her rough teenage years. Many confused teenagers found solace while reading this book and eventually became an unofficial part of Margaret and her friends' secret club discussing their first period, bras, and boys. 



 

Now, not only are a new generation of youngsters be introduced to Margret's secret club, her older fans, too, will get an opportunity to take a walk down memory lane as Margaret is now making her way to the big screen. According to Vulture, Lionsgate has won the rights to the movie adaption of the book during an auction, and Blume has given her blessing for the film to be made after refusing to do so for a long time. After receiving the green light from Blume, the film is prepared to go into production. Producer James L. Brooks’ Gracie Films and director Kelly Fremon Craig, who collaborated on The Edge Of Seventeen, are already attached to the adaption. They will be joined by Julie Ansell, Richard Sakai, and Amy Brooks as producers. 



 

Blume granted the rights and approved Craig and Brooks after they paid her a visit in Key West, reports Deadline. "It is this right of passage for women and girls," Craig told Deadline. "It’s rare for me to run into a woman or girl who hasn’t read it and every time I’ve mentioned it to a woman, they clutch their heart and let out this joyful gasp. There’s something so timely and full of truth and I remember for me that at that age, it felt like a life raft at a time when you’re lost and searching and unsure. This book comes along and tells you you’re not alone. Women remember where they were when they read it. I can’t think of another book you can say that about." 



 

As for James Brooks' daughter, Amy Brooks, she too couldn't help feel nostalgic as soon as she read it. "I was surprised when I read it, how much it took me back and that I hadn’t forgotten those feeling, she said. Taking everyone by surprise, Blume took to Twitter and asked her followers which books of hers would they would like to see as movies. "The strangest and most serendipitous thing happened with Judy’s tweet, that she was considering opening up her titles to be adapted. I read this at 3 AM and wrote my reps in the middle of the night: do whatever you can to get this," added Brooks. Determined to get the rights of the movie, she wrote a lengthy and passionate email to the 80-year-old author. 



 

In the mail, Brooks revealed what Blume's books meant to her. "Particularly Margaret, how it came along at a time when I needed it most. She was the first author who made me fall in love with books and by extension, film," she said. "And then I called Jim Brooks because I thought if somehow we can get this, nobody else will care – and protect – it more." Brooks assured that the adaption of the book, which has been around for half a century, will not feel like another period film. "People have read at various stages and it felt present and immediate. My granddaughter just read it, that’s how all this started, and it was just the other day," she continued. 



 

 

Speaking to Variety, Lionsgate’s president of production Erin Westerman said, "This title was an anthem when we first read it as teens, and it remains timeless and relevant because nothing has captured the coming-of-age experience with the same authenticity, truth, and respect. For that reason, Judy Blume is a beacon for women and girls. Kelly Fremon Craig is a filmmaker we have adored and chased for years, and James L Brooks is a hero to us all." 

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