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Jimmy Carter On Black Lives Matter Protests And George Floyd: "Silence Can Be As Deadly As Violence"

Jimmy Carter On Black Lives Matter Protests And George Floyd: "Silence Can Be As Deadly As Violence"

President Carter called for the government to bring justice to Floyd's family expressed his support for the peaceful protests that are being carried out by everyone.

Image Source: Facebook/President Jimmy Carter

Like many prominent figures, former President of the United States Jimmy Carter has also addressed the unjust killing of George Floyd, which has sparked outrage and protests across the country. In a recent statement, the 95-year-old shared that he and his wife Rosalynn are "pained by the tragic racial injustices and consequent backlash across our nation in recent weeks." He called for the government to bring justice to Floyd's family for the senseless killing of their loved one and expressed his support for the peaceful protests that are being carried out by everyone. However, he criticized the demonstrations that have taken a violent turn

 


STATEMENT FROM FORMER U.S. PRESIDENT JIMMY CARTER Rosalynn and I are pained by the tragic racial injustices and...

Posted by President Jimmy Carter on Wednesday, June 3, 2020

 

 

"Our hearts are with the victims’ families and all who feel hopeless in the face of pervasive racial discrimination and outright cruelty. We all must shine a spotlight on the immorality of racial discrimination. But violence, whether spontaneous or consciously incited, is not a solution," he said in a statement released on Wednesday, according to CNN. "As a white male of the South, I know all too well the impact of segregation and injustice to African Americans," continued the 39th President of the U.S. "As a politician, I felt a responsibility to bring equity to my state and our country."

 



 

 

"In my 1974 inaugural address as Georgia's governor, I said: 'The time for racial discrimination is over.' With great sorrow and disappointment, I repeat those words today, nearly five decades later," he expressed. Carter then went on to highlight the ugly picture that racial prejudice creates in this word. "Dehumanizing people debases us all; humanity is beautifully and almost infinitely diverse. The bonds of our common humanity must overcome the divisiveness of our fears and prejudices," he reminds everyone. The philanthropist then pointed at the fact that "silence can be as deadly as violence" and urged every American in positions of "power, privilege, and moral conscience" to take a stand against the prevalent racial discrimination. 

 

 



 

 

"Since leaving the White House in 1981, Rosalynn and I have strived to advance human rights in countries around the world. In this quest, we have seen that silence can be as deadly as violence. People of power, privilege, and moral conscience must stand up and say "no more" to a racially discriminatory police and justice system, immoral economic disparities between whites and blacks, and government actions that undermine our unified democracy. We are responsible for creating a world of peace and equality for ourselves and future generations," continued the statement. 



 

Declaring himself the "president of law and order" earlier this week, President Donald Trump swore to return the order to American streets even if it meant using military force to do so. Although Carter did not directly address Trump by his name in his recent statement, he noted that the country could do "better than this." His concluding statement read, "We need a government as good as its people, and we are better than this." Carter's sentiments were echoed by Barack Obama, the only black president of the country, in an essay, reports PEOPLE.

 



 

 

On Monday, the former POTUS wrote: "I've heard some suggest that the recurrent problem of racial bias in our criminal justice system proves that only protests and direct action can bring about change, and that voting and participation in electoral politics is a waste of time. I couldn’t disagree more." He continued, "If we want to bring about real change, then the choice isn’t between protest and politics. We have to do both. We have to mobilize to raise awareness, and we have to organize and cast our ballots to make sure that we elect candidates who will act on reform."

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