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Italy Becomes First Country To Make Climate Change A Mandatory Part Of School Curriculum

Italy Becomes First Country To Make Climate Change A Mandatory Part Of School Curriculum

"I want to make the Italian education system the first education system that puts the environment and society at the core of everything we learn in school," - Lorenzo Fioramonti.

Come next academic year, students in Italy will learn about climate change and sustainability. It is mandatory for students across grades and the aim behind it is to portray the country as a pioneer in environmental education, according to CNN. Education Minister Lorenzo Fioramonti stated that all public schools will now devote 33 hours of their yearly curriculum to climate change and related issues. The lessons will be seamlessly integrated with their already existing civics classes, which will have an "environmentalist footprint" from September 2020, according to Vincenzo Cramarossa, Fioramonti's spokesman. 



 

"The idea is that the citizens of the future need to be ready for the climate emergency," Cramarossa said. In addition to this, sustainable development will also appear in more traditional subjects, such as geography, math, and physics. "There will be more attention to climate change when teaching those traditional subjects," he explained. Fioramonti, who is an economics professor at South Africa's Pretoria University said changes are being made to the ministry as well. 



 

Fioramonti told Reuters during an interview that the entire ministry "is being changed to make sustainability and climate the center of the education model." He also added, "I want to make the Italian education system the first education system that puts the environment and society at the core of everything we learn in school." He also mentioned talks of redeveloping the national curriculum with increased attention toward climate change and sustainability with the help of a panel consisting of scientific experts. 



 

The panel includes Jeffrey D. Sachs, director of Columbia University's Center for Sustainable Development, and American economic and social theorist Jeremy Rifkin. "It's a world's first to have a (compulsory) national education in that sense," Cramarossa said. The anti-establishment Five Star Movement, of which Fioramonti is a part of, does have a history of environmental concern and grassroots activism.



 

Ever since Fioramonti Has assumed the position of Education Minister, he has been scrutinized by right-wing opposition parties for extending his support to students protesting climate change and for backing taxes on plastic and sugary drinks. The world thought differently and considered it to be a good strategy that deserved global implementation. Souhaiga Mina took to Facebook to share: I had a test couple of weeks ago and my essay part was about climate change. I had no Ideas because I never sit down and read about this issue. The Bottom line is I think is a good idea to teach this



 

Disclaimer : This is based on sources and we have been unable to verify this information independently.

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