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12-Year-Old Girl Fighting Rare Disease Invents A Teddy Bear That Hides Her IV Bag

12-Year-Old Girl Fighting Rare Disease Invents A Teddy Bear That Hides Her IV Bag

"As I saw more and more children experiencing the same feelings, I became more interested in creating a friendlier experience for young IV patients, so I created Medi Teddy," says Ella on her website.

Many would agree when I say that hospitals have a scary vibe to it. A place filled with patients and countless illnesses is not the ideal place for children or for anyone for that matter. While there are some adults who still get a bit panicky being in the hospital, can you imagine how hard it must be for children?  One particular kid named Ella Casano made it her mission to make life a little easier for pediatric patients according to reports.



 

The 12-year-old from Connecticut requires to be hooked up to an IV in order to receive an infusion of medicine every eight weeks owing to her chronic illness that she has been suffering from for quite some time now. According to her website, she was diagnosed with idiopathic thrombocytopenic purpura, popularly known as ITP which can never be cured but can be treated. This disease lacking a cure kills platelets in her blood and so she is required to receive timely medication.



 

Although she frequently visits the hospice to get her regular dosage Ella couldn't get used to the scary nature of her treatment. Moreover, she noticed how nervous her fellow patients were during the whole thing, therefore, she decided to do something about it. Ella then created a Medi Teddy which could help kids like her get through the process without much discomfort. Essentially the Medi Teddy serves as a stuffed teddy bear pouch which efficiently hides the IV bag or bottles while making the child feel at ease. 



 

Speaking about her intimidating experience Ella wrote on her website: "When I had my first infusion, I was surprised and a little bit intimidated by the look of the amount of tubing and medical equipment on my IV pole." She added how this feeling of terror made her think of creation something comforting. "As I saw more and more children experiencing the same feelings, I became more interested in creating a friendlier experience for young IV patients, so I created Medi Teddy."



 

Since the origin of this idea, Ella put her design forth which was thankfully accepted by everyone. Now, she has a patent for this stuffed animal and has created several prototypes for it. A manufacturing company is waiting to produce more of her creation but Ella needs to order a minimum of 500 of these to get started. To achieve that goal she has created a GoFundMe account that will help her raise the money required to start the process.



 

As of now, her family is in the process of applying Medi Teddy to get IRS approval with the hope that it becomes a nonprofit according to the GoFundMe page. The site also reveals Ella's plan of donating the first 500 bears to children who have to go through such treatments on a regular basis just like her. "I hope that Medi Teddy helps you just as much as it helps me," Ella wrote on the page asking people to help her achieve her goal. Right now an amount of $11,260 has been already raised exceeding the goal amount of $5,000 in just 4 days!



 

The Twitterati seem quite taken with this genius idea. One of the users, @TSAUSAKIDwrote: I don’t care how old you are...looking over and seeing this guy has to be comforting. Agreeing to this @ThomaslanRusse5 wrote: This girl is a genius! What a brilliant idea! Hospitals scare children and a lot of adults. What a wonderful way to lessen the stress on children in this situation. Ella isn't only very smart, she's very caring. God bless her!



 

Others like @SandraMattan didn't necessarily think it's the best idea. She wrote: Not a good idea. Mistakes are made as it is let alone having a visual blocked. Defending the little girl @maureenthemink wrote: You can still clearly see the bag & the contents from the side that would be visible to medical staff. It only seems to reduce visual exposure from the child's vantage point. Twitter user @grumoyraspberry as the name suggests had a grumpy approach to this idea, "Not very easy to keep sterile."



 

@Argentumsmama raised some valid points as she wrote: Ms Casano did good. Still a minor, she has turned a nasty experience around to benefits others. She deserves every well wish in store. My question is: why is a minor child doing the problem-solving, and not the decision-making grownup board of directors?



 

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