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This Southeastern Chinese City Becomes The First To Ban The Consumption Of Dogs And Cats

This Southeastern Chinese City Becomes The First To Ban The Consumption Of Dogs And Cats

The government, under new rules that will come into effect on May 1, added that it will be illegal to eat animals raised as pets.

Image Source: Getty Images/PamelaJoeMcFarlane

In what can only be seen as a drastic decision, Shenzhen, a southeastern Chinese city, has become the first in the country to ban the consumption of cats and dogs, the government announced on Thursday, reports People. The government, under new rules that will come into effect on May 1, added that it will be illegal to eat animals raised as pets. Shenzhen will also ban the consumption of state-protected wild animals and other terrestrial wild animals, along with captive-bred and farmed terrestrial wild species. 



 

This decision comes following the ban to consume wild animals by China in February. However, animals like pig, cattle, sheep, donkey, rabbit, chicken, duck, goose, pigeon, quail, as well as aquatic animals that aren't banned by the new regulations can still be consumed. "If convicted, they will be subjected to a fine of 30 times of the wild animal's value, if the animal is above the value of 10,000CNY [$1400 USD]," announced authorities. Such strict rules have been enforced since the Coronavirus outbreak is believed to have originated at a wildlife market in the Chinese city of Wuhan. 



 

The authorities needed to do something to bring the lucrative wildlife industry under control, especially because no one wants another outbreak like this. However, it's not going to be easy, given the history China, as a country, has with the use of wild animals. It runs deep as wild animals are used not just for food but also for traditional medicine, clothing, ornaments, and even pets. Surprisingly, this is not really the first time that China has tried to curb the sale and consumption of wild animals. Back in 2003, civets (similar to mongoose) were banned and amassed after it was discovered they likely transferred the SARS virus to humans.



 

The selling of snakes was also briefly banned in Guangzhou after the SARS outbreak. But even today, dishes using the animals are consumed in several parts of China. We earlier reported that China's wet markets, which was deemed the source of the COVID-19 pandemic, have reportedly reopened. The wet markets are notorious for selling bats, dogs, and pangolins for human consumption. This was considered dangerous by scientists, especially because of what the world is currently going through. While there are several possibilities of how the outbreak occurred, the origin of the virus still remains unclear but it is not the first time that the wet markets have been held accountable for an outbreak of immense proportions.



 

Rosario Tapia shared on Facebook: It’s about time!!! Please stop massacring and torturing innocent animals!! Just stop there’s no justification whatsoever! Please have compassion and respect for animals they are as much as sentient beings as we are! Sandra Sandru added: It is not the cure. They must stop eating alive animals of all kinds. Just consume meat that don’t create danger. Or even better, they should eat themselves if that is what they want. I’m so mad at everything they have hidden - the world could have been better prepared, we are taking data from Europe! We are 2 months late thanks to them. Carmen Saywell wrote: This is a good move...but the question still remains....where did the virus really originate?? Guess some questions really don't have answers. 



 

Disclaimer : This is based on sources and we have been unable to verify this information independently.

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