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Ex-Americans Answer How Their Lives Have Changed After Leaving The Country

Ex-Americans Answer How Their Lives Have Changed After Leaving The Country

A reddit user asked people what it has been like after they left the United States. Users chimed in with some interesting responses.

Source: Pixabay

There are plenty of Americans out there who have left the land to build a life for themself in a different country. Being enthusiasts and culture buffs, these people decided to experience a different country and its everyday hustle to build a more enriching life. Recently, Reddit user whizzy_thorne posed a question on the famous sub r/AskReddit to former Americans who have not deserted their motherland. As expected, most of them had a vastly different experience considering the United States is a completely different beast when compared to all the other countries out there. So, naturally, the responses made for a refreshing change. Here are a few of these responses.

Source: Reddit

A user, who has since deleted his identity after posting the answer, wrote: "I've lived in several different countries so the changes were different in each one. The one major/constant one is that I travel a lot more now. Not because I have some sort of passion for travel or because I feel like I missed out on it living in the US (I traveled a lot as a kid). It's just so damn easy, that it's not even much of a thought. Traveling outside of your state is a hassle but outside of the U.S., that's a major trip. Traveling to a neighboring country now is a 1-2 hour train and I am in a completely different culture, with a different language, different food, etc."

Source: Reddit

User OnTrack, an American residing in west/central Africa for over 13 years, seems to be living a rudimentary lifestyle—enjoying the little things like being able to take a piss at the side of the road. He has a few gripes, but none of them major for his to desert the life he's built for himself. He wrote: " Negatives about being here: there's not the variety of restaurants found in the states. Health care often isn't very good, though it is really cheap (root canal $80 for example). Many cities don't offer a wide range of activities either. Positives: I can afford a housekeeper twice a week to clean the place and do laundry. Restaurants and bars are really cheap. 24 oz. beer is a dollar. People are very social and easy to meet. There really isn't a lot to spend money on so I save quite a bit of my salary. I can piss along side of the road if I need to and nobody cares.

Source: Reddit

 

Swiss_baby_questions, meanwhile, seems to be enjoying the serene European life in Switzerland for the last five years, a country known for being possibly one of the priciest and the best countries to live in. He wrote that there's not much road rage in the country, which is a positive but misses Mexican food very badly: "The biggest difference is that there is more vacation time and higher salaries. This causes lower stress in general—people are always talking about their next holiday. In fact, it’s hard to get together with friends sometimes because someone is always on holiday! Less road rage and better drivers and public transit goes absolutely everywhere. We drive much less here and didn’t have a car for the first three years. Subsidized pre-school (spielgruppe). No school on Wednesdays. Two hour lunch breaks. All the shops are closed on Sundays and holidays. We cook a lot more because eating out is incredibly expensive. We also lost about 10 lbs each from walking everywhere / eating better."

Source: Reddit

 

Persimmon_Leaves has been a bit of an explorer having stayed in Romania, Georgia, Moldova, and Bulgaria and he's loving that healthcare costs are not as sky-high as it is in the US, a service he believes is the highlight and he's also a fan of public transport. "Main everyday benefits are public transportation is really easy, convenient, and cheap to use every day. I also eat out a lot more because it's much cheaper and more relaxed. I haven't had to deal with health stuff much, but when I have, it's awesome and life changing. For example, I recently partially dislocated my shoulder and am able to afford out of pocket service at one of the best physical therapists in my city. In the US, I can't afford insurance and would just not see a doctor since it isn't extremely painful or life threatening."

Source: Reddit

 

source: Reddit

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