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Museum Refuses To Stop Displaying 'Dukes of Hazzard' Car With Confederate Flag

Museum Refuses To Stop Displaying 'Dukes of Hazzard' Car With Confederate Flag

Regarding the vehicle as "a piece of history" museum director Brian Grams said they have no plans of removing it form display.

Image Source: IMDB/The Dukes of Hazzard

Image Source: IMDB/The Dukes of Hazzard

An automobile museum in northern Illinois has stated that they have no intention of pulling a famous vehicle with a Confederate battle flag on it from the display. According to USA Today, a Dodge Charger from the renowned television show "Dukes of Hazzard" is the vehicle which has the controversial flag painted on it. Their decision comes at a time when statues of Confederate generals and soldiers are being taken down in every part of the country due to the ongoing Black Lives Matter movement. Following the death of George Floyd, people began pouring onto streets protesting the gross systemic racism and police brutality. To express their solitary for the cause many have renounced symbols and activities that directly or indirectly hurt those sentiments.



 

Even NASCAR recently banned the flag from being displayed during its races. Moreover, the Confederate emblem is being removed from the Mississippi state flag. However, the Volo Auto Museum said that the famed "General Lee" from the TV show's first season isn't going anywhere, according to Chicago's Daily Herald. "We feel the car is part of history, and people love it," said museum director Brian Grams while speaking to the newspaper. "We’ve got people of all races and nationalities that remember the TV show and aren’t offended by it whatsoever. It’s a piece of history and it’s in a museum," he continued. 



 

The museum, situated 50 miles (80 kilometers) northwest of Chicago, was acquired in 2005. Grams said that the 1969 Charger is the last surviving token from the first season of the television program and that no one complained about it so far. Although the pressure to get rid of the car, which is regarded as a symbol of racism, continues to grow, the museum has been showered with constant support from people who have been supporting the museum's decision to keep the vehicle. "Several people have reached out with positive comments about us leaving it on display," said Grams, adding, "[People have been] complimenting us for leaving it there and not having a knee-jerk reaction to remove it like a lot of places are."



 

Explaining their decision further, Gram noted that keeping it was more about it being a piece of history than anything. He continued saying that the establishment would not remove General Lee just like it's Nazi memorabilia which on display in the museum’s military section. "If we’re going to get complaints about General Lee being here, we’ve got much worse items over in our military building," he said. The removal of confederate symbols began last month when statues of Confederate soldiers and general became the target of protestors but it quickly stretched beyond those of historical origins. A statue of President George Washington was toppled by protestors in Portland, Oregan, and the following day demonstrators defaced and tumbled the statue of former President Ulysses S. Grant, who during the Civil War led the Union Army, in San Francisco. 



 

Following the attempt to bring down a statue of Andrew Jackson in Washington, D.C.’s Lafayette Square near the White House, last month, President Donal Trump declared that anyone who is caught vandalizing monuments or any other federal property could be subjected to arrest and could face up to 10 years in jail. have authorized the Federal Government to arrest anyone who vandalizes or destroys any monument, statue or other such Federal property in the U.S. with up to 10 years in prison, per the Veteran’s Memorial Preservation Act, or such other laws that may be pertinent, wrote Trump in a tweet. The statue of Andrew Jackson was attacked by protestors who demanded that the historical figure be removed for its controversial racist past. Jackson has been a subject of criticism in the present day for his harsh treatment of Native Americans. Although the protestors failed to bring Jackson's statue down, it was defaced with the words "killer scum" written on the pedestal on Monday night. To counter these increasing number of vandalism of historical monuments brought everyone's attention to the Veterans' Memorial Preservation Act which calls for up to 10 years in prison and the payment of a hefty fine for anyone who destroys or attempts to damage "any structure, plaque, statue, or other monument on public property commemorating the service of any person or persons in the armed forces of the United States."



 

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