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7-Yr-Old Writes Heartbreaking Note To Teacher After Facing Relentless Bullying: "God, Please Take Me"

7-Yr-Old Writes Heartbreaking Note To Teacher After Facing Relentless Bullying: "God, Please Take Me"

Jack Wilkinson had endured relentless bullying at school for years and when he could no longer cope with the cruel taunts, he left a heartbreaking note on his teacher's desk.

Jack Wilkinson had endured relentless bullying at school for years and when he could no longer cope with the cruel remarks, he left a heartbreaking note on his teacher's desk. "God, please take me," wrote the boy when he was just seven years old. According to a report by Daily Mail, Wilkinson, who was in Year 2, had been previously beaten up by his classmates for 10 minutes in the playground after being targetted by his bullies. Wilkinson was diagnosed with an anxiety disorder when he was very young and soon he began struggling with the taunts and bullying directed towards him.



 

Speaking to Daily Mail Australia, Wilkinson's mother Kristy Sturgess revealed that her son was diagnosed with an anxiety disorder when he was quite young and this condition added onto his ongoing struggles of dealing with the cruelty. Initially, the bullying was limited to students called him "crazy" and teasing him, but when he began Year 2, the nature of the bullying became physical and extremely violent. "There's always been kids who had decided Jack was an easy target because of his reactions," she added. "They would say things, call him names, tell him he was crazy."

By the time Jack was six or seven years old, he would come home with tears pooling from his eyes, begging not to be sent to school anymore. The mother from north-west Sydney further shared how her son was heartlessly tripped over by a bully on his first day of school in Year Two. "That was one of the first signs it was going to be an extremely tough year for Jack," she continued. On one occasion Wilkinson was "punched in the head" and eventually the bullying ended in a full-fledged attack. "Jack was physically hit and kicked in the playground for nearly 10 minutes, and was stabbed with a plastic fork in the back," explained Sturgess. 



 

Sturgess recalls Jack's twin Hunter telling her that beating lasted ten minutes before any adults arrived to stop the torture. Recalling the devastating day when she went to pick her son up from school following the beating, she said, "I remember getting to pick Jack up [that day], and he was limping and holding his shoulder, in tears. He had bruises on his legs and a fork mark in his shoulder. I just broke down in tears. That was the final straw for Jack after going through such a hard few years."



 

"He was seven, and he was just done," said the mother, adding how her son had lost all hope by the time he was just seven. "I don't want to be alive," wrote the boy on his pillow and a few weeks later when he returned to school, he left the upsetting note on his teacher's desk. Over the next few months, his mother worked tirelessly to help her son regain a little confidence in himself. With the help of external counselors and programs, including art therapy, they were able to help the boy overcome the devastating ordeal he had been through. 



 

Seeing her son's keen interest in drawing, Sturgess who owns a clothing manufacturing business decided to turn some of Wilkinson's drawings into t-shirts and sell them online to raise money for Kid's Helpline. "You don't expect [what happened to Jack] to happen, but these things are happening, and a lot of the targets are kids suffering from these disorders [like anxiety]," she adding "What Kid's Helpline offer, the support they offer, there are some kids who don't have that. It's about letting people know mental health isn't a taboo thing to talk about - it's okay not to be okay and there are people you can speak to confidentially." 



 

Through his website, Wilkinson later expressed how helpful it was to have someone to talk to while continuing to learn how to manage his anxiety. "It makes me better when I talk to someone," he said in a statement. "And when I know they’re doing something about the bad things, it makes me feel safe. Now, I feel pretty good. But other people are going through the same things as I did and having a hard time. It would be nice for them to be able to talk to Kids Helpline. It would be nice, they’d have a friend, and wouldn’t be as sad or scared."



 

To know more about Jack's journey you can follow him on Facebook or Instagram.

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