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Alyssa Milano Calls For 'Sex Strike' To Protest Strict Abortion Laws Until "We Get Bodily Autonomy Back"

Alyssa Milano Calls For 'Sex Strike' To Protest Strict Abortion Laws Until "We Get Bodily Autonomy Back"

Our reproductive rights are being erased. Until women have legal control over our own bodies we just cannot risk pregnancy. JOIN ME by not having sex until we get bodily autonomy back, reads the tweet.

Actress and activist Alyssa Milano has now started a campaign as she called for a 'sex strike' to protest the strict anti-abortion laws that have been passed recently. Milano took to social media platform Twitter, calling for women to not have sex until “we get bodily autonomy back.”  This comes as a protest just days after Republican Governor Brian Kemp signed one of the nation’s most restrictive anti-abortion laws on Tuesday, according to HuffPost. Our reproductive rights are being erased. Until women have legal control over our own bodies we just cannot risk pregnancy. JOIN ME by not having sex until we get bodily autonomy back, read the tweet.



 

Georgia's controversial 'heartbeat bill' bans abortion if a fetal heartbeat is detected. This happens around six weeks into the pregnancy, which is when most people don't even know they're pregnant. This bill will be effective from January in Georgia. Ohio, Mississippi, Kentucky, Iowa, and North Dakota are the other states that have similar abortion laws. There are a few exceptions to the law; especially if the mom's life is in danger, or if it is a rape case, but these exceptions don't leave a lot of option. 



 

Alyssa Milano is also one of the main people out of the over 40  Hollywood celebrities who have signed a letter to Georgia Governor Brian Kemp and House Speaker David Ralston stating that they would urge TV and film production companies to abandon shooting in the state if the heartbeat abortion bill becomes a law. Georgia is the business hub for a lot of these production companies. Milano was also a frontrunner for the #metoo movement. 



 

 

Milano's tweet garnered a lot of attention on social media, with over 17,000 likes and 14,000 replies. There were a lot of mixed reviews on her Tweet. A user named Ms. Deathwish replied to Milano's tweet: My husband is as outraged as I am. Why should we not have sex? This strike may mean well and contain cheap "feel good" reactions but it pushes a sexist narrative that sex is something WE give to men as a form of currency. That is not empowering. At all. She wrote, in a second tweet: To add to this, I support the intent behind it but I do not support the action taken or the message it portrays. Withholding sex from men without making THEM accountable for THEIR actions achieves nothing.



 

 

Another user named Kiki Adine supported the strike: Saw lots of people criticizing this idea today. I fully support a sex strike. It’s not admitting that we are here to service men. It’s reminding them that we have control over our own bodies and how we use them. Boycotting sex is an effective method of protest. #SexStrike Kate Kelly too supported the strike: Join us in helping cis men feel the physical consequences of our reproductive rights being systematically eliminated! #SexStrike



 

 

Vicki commented: I wonder if men could get pregnant, carry a baby to term, etc if they'd still want this law in place. Screw this bill. It's totally unjust and any woman should have the right to so what she wants in regards to reproducing PERIOD. The 6wk timeframe is ridiculous. Lani Serota wrote: I will continue to have protected, amazing sex with my feminist, pro-choice husband, thanks much. This is absurd and puritanical. Sex isn’t a gift we give men; it is just a gift, straight up.



 

 

This is not the first time someone's called for a sex strike. Milano also shared a report from 2017 by Quartz that said this strike is an effective strategy for political change. The first instance of it was in 1600. Iroquois women reportedly refused to engage in sex as a way to stop unregulated warfare. Surprisingly the tactic worked: they gained veto power concerning all future wars and paved the way for future feminist rebellions.



 

 

More recently, in 2003, Leymah Gbowee organized a well-publicized sex strike to end Liberia’s brutal civil war. Not only did warlords agree to end the violence, but it also resulted in Gbowee later being awarded a Nobel Peace Prize for her efforts! There are more instances: Kenyan women followed suit in 2009, enforcing a sex ban until political infighting ceased. Within one week, there was a stable government. And in the Philippines, a sex strike led to peace in a violence-plagued Mindanao Island village.



 

Disclaimer : This is based on sources and we have been unable to verify this information independently.

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