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Thanks To Abortion Ban, Even Survivors Of Rape Cannot End Their Suffering In Alabama

Thanks To Abortion Ban, Even Survivors Of Rape Cannot End Their Suffering In Alabama

The bill that was signed into a law on Wednesday will be effective in six months with some definite legal challenges.

On May 15, the Alabama governor signed into law banning abortions of all kinds. The law will apply to the victims of rape or incest as well. This comes as a complete overturn to the Roe v. Wade law which allowed abortions to these victims for nearly 50 years. The staggering bill was passed by the state Senate on Tuesday. On Wednesday, Governor Kay Iver gave her statement, acknowledging the challenges they would be facing ahead reported PEOPLE.



 

She referred to the ban as "a powerful testament to Alabamians’ deeply held belief that every life is precious and that every life is a sacred gift from God." Explaining this, she said, "No matter one’s personal view on abortion, we can all recognize that, at least for the short term, this bill may … be unenforceable. As citizens of this great country, we must always respect the authority of the U.S. Supreme Court even when we disagree with their decisions."



 

Iver further expressed her disagreement over Roe v. Wade coming to place, as she said, "Many Americans, myself included, disagreed when Roe v. Wade was handed down in 1973." She continued, "The sponsors of this bill believe that it is time, once again, for the U.S. Supreme Court to revisit this important matter, and they believe this act may bring about the best opportunity for this to occur."



 

According to this law, anyone who performs or even makes an attempt to perform an abortion will be criminally prosecuted. After the law passes it would be a felony to do so. The doctor responsible for it will be penalized and could be jailed for more than 99 years in prison, whereas, the woman would not be facing any kind of prosecution. 



 

According to the Associated Press, the ban will be effective six months from being signed into law. This would make it the most expansive ban in this country. While every faction of this issue agree that resistance is imminent and it's likely to be temporarily halted, several judges put forth their stance on the matter. When Brett Kavanaugh was replaced by retiring Supreme Court Justice Anthony Kennedy, last year people finally saw a ray of hope.  The ban's supporters believed their decades-long hopes of putting an end to a woman’s constitutional right to end her pregnancy.



 

AL.com reports, this law didn't exclude rape and incest victims from this law simply because the lawmakers wanted to maintain the most rigid restrictions before the Supreme Court. State Sen. Clyde Chambliss said, "When God creates the miracle of life inside a woman’s womb, it is not our place as human beings to extinguish that life. New York Times reported that Sen. Greg Redd too stated, "An unborn baby is a child who deserves protection — and despite the best efforts of abortion proponents, this bill will become law because Alabamians stand firmly on the side of life" agreeing with his fellow abortion opponents. Those opposing the ban criticized the way the legislation seized women's personal liberty for a petty political stance. They agree that it is bound to leave the Alabama taxpayers worried when it comes to any lengthy legal fight.



 

Times reported a statement by Planned Parenthood Southeast Advocate Staci Fox said, "Banning abortion is bad enough. Imprisoning doctors for providing care goes beyond the brink. Alabama politicians will forever live in infamy for this vote and we will make sure that every woman knows who to hold accountable." An Alabama Senate, Linda Coleman-Madison was of the view that this abortion restriction would actually make desperate women seek other unsafe options which could put them at more risk.



 

"We want abortions to be safe, and we want them to be few, but it should be legal because there will be abortions," Madison said, according to toTimes. "The people who have the wherewithal will fly out of state,” she said. “Not everyone can afford to do that." According to AL.com, Sen. Bobby Singleton's effort towards urging his colleagues to exempt rape and incest victims from the law resulted turned out to be futile. "This is just a shame, this is a disgrace, this is a travesty," he said. He also brought in many rape survivors to share their stories with the Senate to change his views.



 

Although several polls have shown that the majority of Americans are supportive of having access to abortion, it cannot be determined for sure as it has an estranging effect among various religious and political groups. Last year, Alabama which is one of the most conservative states in the country, modified its constitution to "support the sanctity of unborn life and the rights of unborn children." The amendment was passed 60-40 percent by voters. 



 

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