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18-Month-Old Baby Finally Reunites With Immigrant Mom After Being Brutally Separated At Border In Heartbreaking Video

18-Month-Old Baby Finally Reunites With Immigrant Mom After Being Brutally Separated At Border In Heartbreaking Video

Juliet finally met her mother after two months at the San Fransico International Airport. The emotional and overwhelming moment had the mother in tears.

Ever since Donald Trump came into power, one of his main areas of focus has been the Mexican border. He has expressed his desire to stop immigrants from entering the US on many occasions. The wall he has constantly been talking about has not yet been built but the security across the border has become a lot more strict. It is much harder for Mexicans or anyone traveling from Mexico to enter the country now. This is all because of the number of illegal immigrants that enter the country through Mexico. The president believes that the troops at the border are ill-equipped to deal with illegal immigrants and other than tightening the security, he has had various other plans, such as the wall. The much-debated border wall is not yet under construction but its possibility is very uncertain. Donald Trump also opened up about another plan, the "zero-tolerance" approach to illegal crossings. The introduction of this migration policy has seen around 2300 children being separated from their parents at the border, since May 2018.

The case of Sindy Ortiz Flores and her 18-month-old daughter Grethshell Juliet is just one example of the effects of the migration policy. Many others have been affected in similar ways. Why is this case focused on? Because Juliet is just 18 months old and recently, she finally got to meet her mother again. The separation took place last December when Flores' husband Kevin Ventura Corrales was arrested near Calexico, California, for illegally re-entering the United States with their daughter. When he was caught, the authorities took their daughter away from Corrales.


 
 
 
 
 
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United States Border Patrol officials took Juliet from Corrales and turned her over to the Office of Refugee Resettlement, part of the Department of Health and Human Services. The toddler was then transferred to a shelter in Texas where she spent two months of her life, waiting to see her family again. Last week, the girl was reunited with her mother. The moment was captured on tape and posted on social media platform, Twitter, by Public Defender, Senior Staff Attorney, and Director of Policy at Brooklyn Defender Services Scott Hechinger.



 

Juliet finally met her mother after two months at the San Fransico International Airport. In the video, the child is seen being held by a social worker before she was finally handed into her mothers' arms after what seemed like the longest time. The child is heard howling in the airport while meeting her mother. The emotional and overwhelming moment had the mother in tears. Her face is seen slowly turning red as she quietly sobs while holding her baby. Many families that have been separated at the border have not yet been lucky enough to reunite.



 

Recently, a 7-year-old girl who was taken into custody by the border patrol agents passed away due to exhaustion and dehydration that was caused by the ill-treatment she faced while in custody. This suggests that all the people that are caught for illegally entering the country, including the children, are treated in an inhumane manner. There are organizations fighting against the way they are treated. People suggest that at least the children should be treated nicely, they did not land up in such situations because of their own doing. They are merely children.


 
 
 
 
 
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When interviewed by KQED News, Flores said that the separation had been very difficult. She said, "I felt desperate and helpless, not knowing what do do. I've been so nervous, wondering whether they were going to give her back to me or not."She also mentioned how she spent long weeks trying to get in touch with every government agency she could in order to try and locate her daughter. She then started to make attempts to get her back home. She described the whole process to be a struggle. The family finally received help from Mijente, an immigrant advocacy group, before they were reunited.


 
 
 
 
 
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A representative from the organization, Lisa Castellanos, said that the government originally demanded a payment of $4,000 as well as a credit card number from Flores to cover the cost of her daughter's travel arrangements. The mother did not have either. Officials finally agreed to settle after the family's story had gained so much media attention. The people protested against the officials charging a fee for this tragic story. In the end, the toddler was transported to her mother free of charge. However, Flores' husband is still under immigration detention.


 
 
 
 
 
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The family fled Honduras, a nation suffering from political instability, as they feared persecution. Flores has an uncle who lives in San Fransico and so the couple decided to move in with him with Juliet and two other children. The family was separated in Mexico before the patrol officers arrested Flores' husband and placed him in detention for illegally reentering the country. He also has prior deportation charges. The husband is the only family member who has not yet been granted asylum. 

Assistant Chief Patrol Agent David Kim from the Border Patrol's El Centro sector stated, "The father was separated from the child because he was being criminally prosecuted for felony 8 USC 1326 (illegal re-entry)." He continued, "Once a person is charged with a felony and they get rolled into the criminal process, a child is not going to accompany them."  Sadly, this is the situation of thousands of families ever since the new policy was introduced. 

Disclaimer : This is based on sources and we have been unable to verify this information independently.

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